Francesca Ferlaino

Since July 1st the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Innsbruck has a new Scientific Director: Experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino. The successful researcher is also Professor at the University of Innsbruck.

Francesca Ferlaino

Read more: New Scientific Director at the IQOQI

A new technology transfers magnetic fields to arbitrary long distances, which is comparable to transmitting and routing light in optical fibers.

A Catalan, German and Austrian group of physicists has developed a new technology to transfer magnetic fields to arbitrary long distances, which is comparable to transmitting and routing light in optical fibers. Oriol Romero-Isart and his colleagues have theoretically proposed and already tested this new device experimentally. The field of possible applications is broad and includes spintronic and quantum computers among others.

Illustration: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Read more: Innovation: Magnetic Field Conductors

The mysterious Efimov scenario

[2014-05-13] Some years ago, Rudolf Grimm’s team of quantum physicists in Innsbruck provided experimental proof of Efimov states – a phenomenon that until then had been known only in theory. Now they have also measured the second Efimov resonance of three particles in an ultracold quantum gas, thus, proving the periodicity of this universal physical phenomenon experimentally.

Illustration: IQOQI/Harald Ritsch

Read more: Quantum Trimer – From a Distance

This 7-ion system applied for encoding one logical quantum bit can be used as a building block for much larger quantum systems. The bigger the lattice, the more robust it becomes.

In a close collaborative effort, Spanish and Austrian physicists have experimentally encoded one quantum bit (qubit) in entangled states distributed over several particles and for the first time carried out simple computations on it. The 7-qubit quantum register could be used as the main building block for a quantum computer that corrects any type of error. The researchers’ results have now been published in Science.

IQOQI/Harald Ritsch

Read more: Quantum Computation: Fragile yet Error-free

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